Federal Grants

Federal Grants

Almost all federal grants are awarded to students with financial need.  If you are interested in a  federal grant, you have to start by submitting a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form. You have to fill out the FAFSA every year you’re in school in order to stay eligible for federal student aid. Once you’ve done that, you’ll work with your college to find out how much you can get and when you’ll get it.

On this page:

Federal Pell Grant

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

Would I ever need to repay all or part of a federal grant?

 

Federal Pell Grant

Federal Pell Grant:

    • Money that the U.S. federal government provides to eligible students to help with the cost of college; these funds are considered "gift aid" and do not need to be repaid
    • The Pell Grant is awarded only to undergraduate students who have not earned a bachelor's or a professional degree. 
          • In some cases, however, a student enrolled in a postbaccalaureate teacher certification program might receive a Federal Pell Grant.
    • Amounts can change yearly. The maximum Federal Pell Grant award is $5,815 for the 2016–17 award year (July 1, 2016, to June 30, 2017). For the 2017–18 award year (July 1, 2017, to June 30, 2018), the maximum award will be $5,920. The amount you get, though, will depend on
          • your Estimated Family Contribution
          • your financial need,
          • your cost of attendance,
          • your status as a full-time or part-time student, and
          • your plans to attend school for a full academic year or less. 
    • You may not receive Federal Pell Grant funds from more than one school at a time.
    • You are not eligible to receive a Federal Pell Grant if you are incarcerated in a federal or state penal institution or are subject to an involuntary civil commitment upon completion of a period of incarceration for a forcible or nonforcible sexual offense.

PELL Lifetime Eligibility Used (LEU):

Effective on July 1, 2012, you can receive the Federal Pell Grant for no more than 12 semesters or the equivalent (roughly six years - 600%). You’ll receive a notice if you’re getting close to your limit. 

    • If your Pell Lifetime Eligibility Used (LEU) equals or exceeds 600%, you may no longer receive Pell Grant funding.
    • Similarly, if your LEU is greater than 500% but less than 600%, while you will be eligible for a Pell Grant for the next award year, you will not be able to receive a full scheduled award.

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Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG):

    • A federal assistance grant reserved for college students with the greatest need for financial aid to attend school
    • FSEOG does not have to be repaid.
    • Awarded to degree seeking undergraduate students who have not earned a bachelor's degree.
    • Administered by the Office of Financial Aid.
    • Priority is given to students who receive a Federal Pell Grant.
    • Students must have exceptional financial need.
    • Due to the availability of funds at the school, there is no guarantee that every eligible student will be able to receive an FSEOG.
    • Maximum yearly award at Millersville University is $800.

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Would I ever need to repay all or part of a federal grant?

Here are some examples of why you might have to repay all or part of a federal grant:

    • You withdrew early from the program for which the grant was given to you.
    • Your enrollment status changed in a way that reduced your eligibility for your grant (for instance, if you switch from full-time enrollment to part-time, your grant amount will be reduced).
    • You received outside scholarships or grants that reduced your need for federal student aid.
    • For a TEACH Grant, you did not meet the requirements of your TEACH Grant service obligation.

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